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Subject: Dry Yeast for IPA
Author: bostonbrewer
Apr 6th, 2005
2:08 pm
Anyone know what dry yeast to use in an IPA w/ ABV around 6.3%? I don't feel like this brew requires liquid since my IBU's will be in the 68 range, I figure it will overpower any effects the yeast may have on the flavor.

Please correct me if my assumption is wrong.
Subject: Re: Dry Yeast for IPA
Author: MAZ
Apr 6th, 2005
3:33 pm
My regular dry yeasts are Safale S-04 and Nottingham. I think either would work well in an IPA. I've got a SNCA clone fermenting with Nottingham at the moment. Smells great!
Subject: Re: Dry Yeast for IPA
Author: DConn
Apr 6th, 2005
3:35 pm
Yeah, either of those would be fine. But I disagree that just because a beer has a higher OG or IBU level that the yeast isn't as critical. My rye IPA is 1.073 and 75 IBU and yeast variety makes a huge difference in the finished beer.
Subject: Re: Dry Yeast for IPA
Author: MAZ
Apr 6th, 2005
3:49 pm
I agree Denny. Recently I got into Wyeast 1275 (Thames Valley)... used it for a Mild, an ESB, and also for an Imperial IPA. The yeast definitely makes a difference in the flavor, even for the big, hoppy IIPA.

On the other hand, BB shouldn't assume all dry yeasts produce off-flavors or other things that need to be "covered-up" by a hoppy IPA. I love my results with the 2 I mentioned and use them regularly for my American and English style brews.
Subject: Re: Dry Yeast for IPA
Author: bostonbrewer
Apr 6th, 2005
5:10 pm
I should clarify- I meant that in my case for my recipe where I am not looking for a particular flavor imparted by a yeast, I would rather use a dry yeast to try and minimize cost, rather than spending the 7 bucks for a common ale yeast. Obviously my assumption was wrong! LOL so I just learned something new.

This is my first recipe created on my own and I am not familiar enough with different yeasts to know which I would want to use. I figure first go around use dry and see if I even like the recipe before dropping half the cost on yeast.
Subject: Re: Dry Yeast for IPA
Author: MAZ
Apr 6th, 2005
5:42 pm
BB - sounds like a good plan. If you really want the yeast to "get out of the way" I would go with Nottingham. It is quite neutral.
Subject: Re: Dry Yeast for IPA
Author: bostonbrewer
Apr 6th, 2005
5:52 pm
Cool, thanks. Will that handle the higher OG with no problem? In the past when I have used dry yeast (I did switch to liquid for the last 6 batches) I just sprinkled the dry on top and then mixed it in after 10 minutes. Should I do a starter instead?
Subject: Re: Dry Yeast for IPA
Author: DConn
Apr 6th, 2005
5:56 pm
Dry yeast has many more cells than liquid yeast, so a starter isn't necessary. You can either sprinke it on directly or rehydrate it in 95F water first.
Subject: Re: Dry Yeast for IPA
Author: bostonbrewer
Apr 6th, 2005
5:58 pm
Muchos Gracias
Subject: Re: Dry Yeast for IPA
Author: Hopz
Apr 6th, 2005
6:03 pm
Also, BB, using a yeast you are familiar with now, will help you decide if you like your recipe.
When we change too many variables, we don't know what caused the good or bad results.
Subject: Re: Dry Yeast for IPA
Author: bostonbrewer
Apr 6th, 2005
6:17 pm
This is my first IPA. My last recipe was a Shiner Bock clone that I used Wyeast Munich Lager on. Prior to that I used WL California Common on 2 batches and before that WL Irish Ale? I think for a stout. So I don't really know what I would use for a liquid in an IPA.
Subject: Re: Dry Yeast for IPA
Author: dWiGhTSATX
Apr 6th, 2005
11:54 pm
Bostonbrewer: Give the WL-Irish Ale a try with your IPA... I have used it on an IPA I do that turns out a very malty beer that is well balanced with the high IBU (around 90 range). It is one of the yeasts that I find it helps to rouse the yeast every day while it is fermenting in order to get a good attenuation from it. I usually see an apparent attenuation of about 79% when I do that.

dWIGhT

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